Resignation Interview Preparation Guide
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Resignation Interview Questions and Answers will guide you how to deal with Resignation related interview questions, resignation is the formal act of giving up or quitting ones office or position. It can also refer to the act of admitting defeat in a game like chess, indicated by the resigning player declaring I resign, so start learning about the Resignation with the help of this Resignation Interview Questions with Answers guide

18 Resignation Questions and Answers:

1 :: How would you resign from a company if you had decided upon that option?

Applicant should understand that they need to give sufficient notice and would allow for discussion with their superiors regarding the matter.
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2 :: Explain Have you ever been fired?

If the candidate has, they should use extreme caution when answering the question. Convincing reasons will be necessary and should be planned before the interview.
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3 :: Explain Have you ever been asked to resign?

If the candidate has, they should explain the situation in a positive manner. Interviewer will look for positive and/or negative reasons, ethical reasons, or they may try to determine whether or not the applicant would have been fired had they not resigned.
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4 :: Are There Any Employee Benefits When You Leave Your Job?

Find out about the employment related benefits that you may be eligible for when you resign, get fired, or get laid-off from your job. Here's information on unemployment, severance packages, giving notice, writing a resignation letter, health insurance, retirement plans, workers compensation, disability, references and more resources for people who are changing jobs.
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5 :: Are there any Reasons to Not Give Two Weeks Notice?

Under normal circumstances, giving two weeks notice is standard practice. However, I often hear from employees who are working under very difficult circumstances or just started a job and know it isn't going to work out and aren't sure what to do. Should they stick it out for another couple of weeks or are there times when you can give less than two weeks notice or no notice at all?

In most cases, it is advisable, even in difficult employment situations, to give the mandatory two weeks notice (or more in some cases) which has been outlined in an employer's policy guidelines. You never know when a previous employer might be contacted by a prospective one, so it is wise to leave on the best possible terms. It can impact your future employment options if a prospective employer is told that you quit without notice.
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6 :: Tell me Can I Collect Unemployment if I Resign From My Job?

When you resign from your job you may not be eligible for unemployment benefits. In most cases, if you quit voluntarily you are not eligible. However, if you left for good cause you may be able to collect unemployment benefits.

Reasons considered good cause could include, for example, unsafe working conditions, not being paid, a change in your job duties, discrimination, health and safety risks on the job, or some types of family emergencies. Here's more information on quitting for good cause and collecting unemployment.

Good cause is determined by the state unemployment office, and it varies by state. When you file for unemployment, you will be able to make a case for why you are eligible for unemployment benefits if the employer contests your claim. If your claim is denied, you should be entitled to a hearing where you can plead your case.
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7 :: Explain can a Company Fire You After You Give Notice?

I'm often asked about what can happen after you give two weeks notice to an employer. Employees wonder if the company is obligated to keep them on the payroll for the duration of their employment.

When a Company Can Fire You

In most cases, an employer can fire you or stop paying you after you give notice. That's because most employees are considered employed at will, which means that the company can terminate you at any time for no reason. Workers with employment contracts or covered by union agreements are generally protected in this situation, as are employees who have been discriminated against. Some state laws include exceptions to at-will employment policies, as well.
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8 :: Tell me Can I Get Unemployment If I Quit?

One of the questions I'm asked quite often is can I get unemployment if I quit a job? When you quit your job you may not be eligible for unemployment benefits. In most cases, if you quit you are not eligible for unemployment. However, if you left for a good reason (technically defined as quitting for good cause) you may be able to collect unemployment benefits.

Good Cause Reasons to Quit a Job

Reasons considered good cause can include not being paid, an unsafe or unhealthy work environment, a change in your job responsibilities, discrimination, health and safety risks on the job, or some types of family emergencies.
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9 :: Tell us Can Staying With a Company Hurt Your Career?

I’ve talked to job seekers who were unexpectedly unemployed after spending 10 or 20 years at the same job with the same company. They were worried about whether it would impact their chances of getting hired, and it could.

There’s a fine line between establishing tenure at a company to show that you’re not a job hopper and staying so long that employers are hesitant to hire you. For many jobs, employers seek both some tenure and career progression, so it can be a balancing act to decide when you need to move on. For example, some companies are now posting tenure requirements in job ads:

Good tenure with no more than two jobs in five years unless progressive growth in the same company.
Must have 5 years tenure at each of two prior companies.

However, there is such a thing as too much tenure. If you work at the same job for too long, future employers may assume that you are not motivated or driven to achieve. Other employers might think that you are most comfortable with the familiar and would have difficulty adapting to a new job, leadership style or corporate culture.

In addition, if you remain in the same job for too long employers might think you have a less diverse and evolved set of skills than a candidate that has mastered a broader range of jobs.
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10 :: Do I Have to Give Two Weeks Notice?

Under normal circumstances, giving two weeks notice is standard practice. However, I often hear from employees who are working under very difficult circumstances or just started a job and know it isn't going to work out and aren't sure what to do. Should they stick it out for another couple of weeks or are there times when you can give less than two weeks notice or no notice at all?

In most cases, it is advisable, even in difficult employment situations, to give the mandatory two weeks notice (or more in some cases) which has been outlined in an employer's policy guidelines. You never know when a previous employer might be contacted by a prospective one, so it is wise to leave on the best possible terms. It can impact your future employment options if a prospective employer is told that you quit without notice.

Reasons Not to Give Two Weeks Notice

However, there may be some circumstances like the following where leaving sooner might be permissible:

An employee has been physically abusive
A supervisor has sexually harassed you
The work environment is unsafe or it is unsafe to carry out your assigned responsibilities
Your mental health is being seriously endangered by job stress
You have not been paid the agreed upon wage or wages have been withheld for an unreasonable length of time
You have been asked to do something which is clearly unethical or illegal
Personal or family circumstances are such that you need to leave the job
A crisis has happened in your life, and there is no way you can continue on the job

Before You Quit Your Job

In most cases, it will make sense to contact the Human Resources department or management officials not directly involved with your grievance to discuss your situation and explore possible remedies or accommodations prior to giving notice. In some cases it will also make sense to consult a counselor or therapist to help you cope with job stress.
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