Police Officer Interview Preparation Guide
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Police Officer frequently Asked Questions in various Police Officer job Interviews by interviewer. The set of questions here ensures that you offer a perfect answer posed to you. So get preparation for your new job hunting

28 Police Officer Questions and Answers:

1 :: What are the duties and functions of Police Officer?

Responsibilities of a police officer are varied, and may differ greatly from within one political context to another. Typical duties relate to keeping the peace, law enforcement, protection of people and property, making us feel safe and protected and the investigation of crimes. Officers are expected to respond to a variety of situations that may arise while they are on duty.
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2 :: Why you want to work in police force?

"I have always appreciated and admired those who put their lives on the line to protect our communities. My interest really piqued in law enforcement however, after I witnessed a domestic dispute and watched the responding officers diffuse the situation. I heard the calling as I saw the
officers control the situation and remove one of the parties from harm's way. It was then I knew that this is what I was meant to do."
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3 :: Who is Police Officer?

"officer" is the formal name of the lowest police rank. In many other countries, "officer" is a generic term not specifying a particular rank, and the lowest rank is often "constable". In many other countries there is no such title as "police officer", as the use of the rank "officer" is legally reserved for military personnel only and thus not applicable.
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4 :: Tell us something about yourself?

"I'm a very energetic and well-rounded person who can follow instructions well. I am a good communicator and quite a team player. At the last department I was with I initiated advanced medic classes for the officers who were interested in learning new first-aid techniques. It had such a positive impact that they are offering the same course again this year."
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5 :: What you like to say about your previous chief?

"My last chief taught me the importance of time management - he didn't pull any punches, and was extremely driven. His no-nonsense attitude pushed me to work harder, and to meet goals I never even thought were possible."
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6 :: Why you leave your current job?

"I've learned a lot from my current role, but now I'm looking for a new challenge, to broaden my horizons and to gain new skill-sets - all of which, I see the potential for in this department."
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7 :: Where do you see yourself after five years?

"In five years I'd like to have an even better understanding of what it takes to be a good officer. Also, I really enjoy being the first to a scene, and I work very well under pressure. Ultimately, I'd like to be in a commander-type position, where I can use my organizational skills and industry knowledge to benefit the people working with me, and those we are there to help."
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8 :: What salary are you expecting for?

"I'm more interested in the role itself than the pay. That said, I'd expect to be paid the appropriate range for this job, based on my five years of experience. I also think a fair salary would bear in mind the high cost of living here in New York City."
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9 :: Why we hire you?

"I've been a law enforcement officer for the past five years - my chief has said time and time again that without me, the
department wouldn't function as well as it currently does. I've also taken the time to educate myself on some of the nonstandard
techniques that may come in handy while on duty. I can react quickly in hectic situations, and can handle the
responsibilities of a leadership role. What's good enough for most people is never really good enough for me."
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10 :: What did you learn from your greatest failure?

"When I was in college, I took an art class to supplement my curriculum. I didn't take it very seriously, and assumed that, compared to my Engineering classes, it would be a walk in the park. My failing grades at midterm showed me otherwise.
I'd even jeopardized my scholarship status. I knew I had to get my act together. I spent the rest of the semester making up for it, ended up getting a decent grade in the class. I learned that no matter what I'm doing, I should strive to do it to the best of my ability. Otherwise, it's not worth doing at all."
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