Web Development Interview Preparation Guide
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Web Development related Frequently Asked Questions in various Web Development job Interviews by interviewer. The set of questions here ensures that you offer a perfect answer posed to you. So get preparation for your new job hunting

60 Web Development Questions and Answers:

1 :: Which industry sites and blogs do you read regularly?

This question can give you an idea of how in-tune they are with the latest industry trends and technologies, as well as how passionate they are about web development. It will help separate the people who do it as a career AS WELL as a hobby from those who might simply be in it for the big developer paychecks.
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2 :: How much comfortable are you with writing HTML entirely by hand?

Although their resume may state that they are an HTML expert, often times many developers ca not actually write an HTML document from top to bottom. They rely on an external publisher or have to constantly flip back to a reference manual. Any developer worth a damn should at least be able to write a simple HTML document without relying on external resources. A possible exercise is to draw up a fake website and ask them to write the HTML for it. Keep it simple and just make sure they have the basics down - watch for mistakes like forgetting the tags or serious misuse of certain elements. If they write something like: , it might be a good hint to wrap things up and call the next interviewee.
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3 :: What is w3c?

Standards compliance in web development is where everything is (hopefully?) going. Don't ask them to recite the w3c's mission statement or anything, but they should at least have a general idea of who they are.
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4 :: How to write table-less XHTML? Do you validate your code?

Weed out the old-school table-driven design junkies! Find a developer who uses HTML elements for what they were actually intended. Also, many developers will say they can go table-less, but when actually building sites they still use tables out of habit and/or convenience. Possibly draw up a quick navigation menu or article and have them write the markup for it. To be tricky, you could draw up tabular data - give them bonus points if they point out that a table should be used in that scenario.
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5 :: So do you prefer to work alone or on a team?

This is an important question to ask depending on the work environment. If your project is going to require close interaction with other developers it's very handy to have someone who has had that kind of experience. On the other hand, many developers thrive while going solo. Try to find a developer that fits your needs.
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6 :: Which few of your favorite development tools and why?

If they say notepad you've obviously got the wrong person for the job. Not only can this help you gauge their level of competence, but it'll also see if they match the tools everyone else uses in-house.
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7 :: Demonstrate your level of competence in a *nix shell environment?

See how well they work without their precious GUI. Ask some basic questions like how they would recursively copy a directory from one place to another, or how you'd make a file only readable by the owner. Find out what OSs they have experience with.
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8 :: How to show portfolio?

A portfolio can say a lot about a developer. Do they have an eye for aesthetics? Are they more creatively or logically oriented? The most important thing is to look for is solid, extensive, COMPLETED projects. A half dozen mockups and/or hacked-out scripts is a sign of inexperience or incompetence.
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9 :: Which sized websites have you worked on in the past?

Find a developer that has experience similar in size to the project you're putting together. Developers with high traffic, large scale site expertise may offer skills that smaller-sized developers don't, such as fine tuning apache or optimizing heavily hit SQL queries. On the other hand, developers who typically build smaller sites may have an eye for things that large scale developers don't, such as offering a greater level of visual creativity.
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10 :: How to show code?

Whether it's plain old HTML or freakishly advanced ruby on rails, ask for code samples. Source code can say more about a persons work habits than you think. Clean, elegant code can often be indicative of a methodical, capable developer. A resume may say 7+ years of perl experience, but that could mean 7 years of bad, unreadable perl. Also, make sure you ask for a lot of source code, not just a few isolated functions or pieces of HTML. Anyone can clean up 20-30 lines of code for an interview, you want to see the whole shebang. Don't ask for a full, functional app, but make sure it's enough that you can tell it's really what their code is like.
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