Decision Making Interview Preparation Guide
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Decision Making Interview Questions and Answers will guide you that Decision making can be regarded as an outcome of mental processes (cognitive process) leading to the selection of a course of action among several alternatives. So learn about the decision making for a job interview with the help of this Decision Making Interview Questions with Answers guide

31 Decision Making Questions and Answers:

1 :: Have you ever faced a situation when you had to take a decision, which did not fall within in your area of responsibility? What decision did you make and how?

Candidate’s answer should show that they know how to take responsibility, that they can make a decision to meet the needs of clients, and that they can make innovative decisions.
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2 :: How do you react in a situation where you need to take an immediate decision? What process will you follow for decision making in such a critical situation?

Candidate should show that they have patience and the good judgment to identify problems first, then prioritize, and plan well in solving problems.
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3 :: Explain an occasion where you had to make a decision on your own? Were you happy with your decision making process?

Candidate should show that they can think logically and wisely to arrive at a decision; Has a balanced thinking process; are not too gentle or too hasty in decision making process.
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4 :: Have you ever tried to delay any decision-making? What were the consequences of this on both your company and customers?

You want to hear that the applicant does not like to delay decision-making, they can make quick decisions, and they can implement decisions in a timely manner.
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5 :: Do you always make decisions on your own without the help of others? In which situations do you seek other’s help for decision-making?

Candidate should show that they have the presence of mind and sensibility to judge any situation and make a decision independently, if required. You should hear that in critical situation candidate will seek advice and guidance to reach correct decision.
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6 :: Define critical thinking?

Critical thinking can be defined in a number of different ways consistent with each other, we should not put a lot of weight on any one definition. Definitions are at best scaffolding for the mind. With this qualification in mind, here is a bit of scaffolding: critical thinking is thinking about your thinking while you're thinking in order to make your thinking better.
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7 :: How to think well?

To think well is to impose discipline and restraint on our thinking-by means of intellectual standards - in order to raise our thinking to a level of "perfection" or quality that is not natural or likely in undisciplined, spontaneous thought. The dimension of critical thinking least understood is that of "intellectual standards." Most teachers were not taught how to assess thinking through standards; indeed, often the thinking of teachers themselves is very "undisciplined" and reflects a lack of internalized intellectual standards.
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8 :: Which things are crucial in Decision Making?

Two things are crucial:
☛ Critical thinking is not just thinking, but thinking which entails self-improvement.
☛ This improvement comes from skill in using standards by which one appropriately assesses thinking. To put it briefly, it is self-improvement (in thinking) through standards (that assess thinking).
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9 :: Give me an example of critical thinking or decision making?

Certainly, one of the most important distinctions that teachers need to routinely make, and which takes disciplined thinking to make, is that between reasoning and subjective reaction.
If we are trying to foster quality thinking, we don't want students simply to assert things; we want them to try to reason things out on the basis of evidence and good reasons. Often, teachers are unclear about this basic difference. Many teachers are apt to take student writing or speech which is fluent and witty or glib and amusing as good thinking. They are often unclear about the constituents of good reasoning. Hence, even though a student may just be asserting things, not reasoning things out at all, if she is doing so with vivacity and flamboyance, teachers are apt to take this to be equivalent to good reasoning.
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10 :: Could this possibly if a rare mistake, not representative of teacher knowledge?

I don't think so. Let me suggest a way in which you could begin to test my contention. If you are familiar with any thinking skills programs, ask someone knowledgeable about it the "Where's the beef?" question.
Namely, "What intellectual standards does the program articulate and teach?" I think you will first find that the person is puzzled about what you mean. And then when you explain what you mean, I think you will find that the person is not able to articulate any such standards. Thinking skills programs without intellectual standards are tailor-made for mis-instruction. For example, one of the major programs asks teachers to encourage students to make inferences and use analogies, but is silent about how to teach students to assess the inferences they make and the strengths and weaknesses of the analogies they use. This misses the point. The idea is not to help students to make more inferences but to make sound ones, not to help students to come up with more analogies but with more useful and insightful ones.
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