Accounting Interview Preparation Guide
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This section of Accounting Interview Questions and Answers will unlock your potential regarding all aspects of Accounting. Accounts is base of any growing business, any business can not grow as an international organization with out Accounting. So if your are a marketing person or having financial expertise then you must have to know about the accounting interview questions and answers techniques here with us.

200 Accounting Questions and Answers:

1 :: Why do you want to be an accountant?

A stereotypical answer to this question is that accountancy offers a respected professional qualification which can lead on to a wide range of opportunities in business. This is all true, but it doesn't answer the question of why YOU want to become an accountant - and if you give as general an answer as this, you can expect to be questioned in detail on the nature of the qualification and the opportunities you see it leading to.

Much of the income of the larger accountancy firms now comes from consultancy and related services rather than from audit. Even in audit you will spend much of your time visiting clients and asking questions, so good interpersonal skills are important. Your answer to this question should probably make this point.

Accountancy is now a fast changing profession, so they are looking for individuals with initiative who can manage change. Ensure that you have a considered answer to this question. It is bound to be asked!
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2 :: Why did you choose the A-levels you did?

The A-level subjects you chose are largely irrelevant, so answer this question honestly, although A levels which demand numeracy, analytical skills and communication skills may help.

If you have not done A levels, but entered university by some other route such as an Access course, explain why this was so - you may find the selectors will in this case put a lot of weight on your degree performance.

A-levels are close to the heart of Accountancy firms. This is because your performance in the profession's examinations have been shown to correlate quite closely to A-level examination performance. Many firms will have a points requirement, but will also be interested in your reasoning behind the choice of subjects.
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3 :: Were you happy with the grades you achieved at A-level?

Chartered Accountancy firms put a lot of weight on A-level grades as these have been found to be the best predictors of success in professional examinations.

If your A levels were not outstanding, this may sometimes depend more on the quality of the school you attended than your ability. In some inner-city schools it may be that a mediocre A-level performance that you achieved might have been the best in your school - if this is so, then make it clear. An average performance at a weak school academically may be the equivalent of a much better performance at some prestigious establishments.

Similarly, if there were any other external factors, such as illness, that may have affected your grades, tell the interviewers - but don't sound as though you are making excuses.
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4 :: How did you chose your university?

Be honest, but try to show evidence for careful consideration and logic in your choice. The interviewer may follow up this question by asking if, with hindsight, you felt you made the right choice, or how you feel the course you have followed could be improved. Constructive and thoughtful criticism is appreciated, but try to balance any criticisms with positive points too.

You could include in your answer any of the following:

* Advice & guidance from teaching/careers staff at school or college
* Geographical preferences
* Availability of a particular course
* The research and/or teaching quality of institutions
* Cost factors
* The reputation of the institution, or individual members of staff
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5 :: What qualities have you got that would make you a good accountant?

Aside from the obvious ones such as numeracy and interpersonal skills, key skills will include determination and self discipline (to get through the difficult professional examinations) and an interest in the business world generally. An ability to work in (and ultimately lead) teams, strong analytical skills, good verbal and written communication skills and curiosity (particularly on the audit side) are some of the others you could mention - if you aren't strong in some of these areas then you may have problems making a persuasive case for yourself.

You are likely to be asked many questions seeking evidence of these particular competencies and will be expected to give examples which are backed up with evidence: for example, if asked about your leadership qualities, you should give an example of where you led a group successfully rather than just stating 'people always look to me to take the lead'.
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